Lisbon Council report shows economic value of flexible copyright

Lisbon Council has published the “2015 Intellectual Property and Economic Growth Index”, which aims to provide evidence for impact of different copyright regimes on economic growth. Positive relation between flexible copyright regimes and economic growth, including in the creative sectors, is the main finding of the report.

Paul Keller, from our member organisation Kennisland, has written an opinion about the report. Paul writes that:

[the report] does make one thing very clear: at least in aggregate, broader and more flexible exceptions and limitations to copyright do not undermine the ability of rights holders to generate income from their rights. In addition, countries with more flexible systems fare much better where it comes to growth of their ICT sectors. In other words, adapting the EU copyright rules by making them less restrictive and more flexible will in all likelihood not result in the collapse of the creative industries in the EU. Instead, such a move can be expected to have a positive impact on the economy of the EU.

Paul’s opinion is available on the Kennisland blog. The report is available at Lisbon Council site.

Intellectual Property Rights do not equal Innovation and Creativity

The post below is cross posted from Kennisland (Kennisland is a COMMUNIA member).

Last month, the Office for the Harmonization of the Internal market (OHIM) and the European Patent Office (EPO) published a study on intellectual property rights intensive industries’ contribution to the economic performance and Employment in the European Union.

The study is modelled after a much criticized 2012 study published by the Department of Commerce and the US Patent and Trademark Office that attempted to measure the impact of IPR intensive industries on the US economy. Both studies come to similar conclusions, namely that IPR intensive industries make significant contributions to overall employment and GDP in the surveyed economies. For the European Union OHIM and EPO claim that:

IPR-intensive industries contribute 26% of employment and 39% of GDP in the EU. (page 6)

The study could be read to imply that without IPR one quarter of us would be out of work and that the EU would suddenly lose more than a third of its economy. Although it is fairly obvious that this is rather unrealistic, it did not prevent EU Commissioner (and noted copyright hawk) Michel Barnier from jumping on the opportunity to express once more how important he thinks that IP rights are:

“I am convinced that intellectual property rights play a hugely important role in stimulating innovation and creativity, and I welcome the publication of this study which confirms that the promotion of IPR is a matter of growth and jobs. It will help us to further underpin our evidence-based policy making.”

Unfortunately, this particular study has almost nothing to do with evidence-based policy making. On the contrary, the study represents one of the more brazen attempts to mislead the public (and policy makers) by throwing lots of data around and calling that evidence.Continue reading