London Manifesto: Copyright has to be fair

“We are calling for fair copyright that is fit for purpose and will benefit every European citizen” – that is the main message of the newly published manifesto, drafted by the Libraries and Archives Copyright Alliance (LACA), convened by the British Chartered Institute for Library and Information Professionals (CILIP). The London Manifesto is one more voice in support of a progressive copyright reform, raised in the ongoing European debate on copyright.

The London Manifesto (PDF) defines, in ten points, reforms that are necessary in order to make copyright fair for all stakeholders. These include:

  • Harmonised exceptions: Harmonisation and uniform application of copyright exceptions across all EU member states so that they apply regardless of media or technology.
  • Open norm: The addition of a new “open norm”, an open-ended exception subject to the three-step test, to avoid the current situation where European creativity and research cannot immediately benefit from technological innovations because copyright legislation is slow to catch up.
  • Right to lend: An automatic “right to lend” for libraries, to include the right to lend all digital media, including transferring digital files for a limited period.
  • Right to mine: An automatic right to perform computer analysis of copyright works for libraries, archives or their users whenever they have lawful access to the content. This recognises that the right to read includes the right to mine.
  • Mass digitisation: An automatic right for libraries, archives and museums to mass digitise their commercially unavailable research collections, and give online access across the whole of the EU without liability to compensate rightholders.
  • Standardised terms of protection for copyright: Swift and complete harmonisation of copyright durations across all member states.

The manifesto has been signed by 30 libraries and library associations, research institutions and organisations, including Communia.

The concept of a copyright system fair to all is an important one, and points to the need of more than just a balance of copyright norms. Fairness needs to be secured for all stakeholders, including those who are not in a privileged position in the copyright debate. We treat the manifesto as one more voice that opposes growing pressure from the cultural industry lobbyists, who believe that copyright reform should only serve to strengthen protection and increase financial gains for copyright owners.

Comments are closed.